Story
Buzz
Gallery
B U Z Z G A L L E R Y
Buzz
all top
user image
Killer Bottlenose Dolphins torture porpoise for fun http://t.co/qzAkeWtoyy #Tweet4Taiji #SeaShepherd
Retweet
user image
Moray Firth Dolphins: Ally.Kemp has added a photo to the pool: Bottlenose Dolphins adult and juvenile breach... http://t.co/ik6BLTKHPF
Retweet
user image
Three bottlenose dolphins born last year at Kamogawa Sea World turn one year old this summer, the calves were... http://t.co/s4jSYbesUy
Retweet
user image
Pink Dolphin. There have only been 14 recorded sightings of albino Bottlenose Dolphins throughout the world. http://t.co/ydF98uj7Hx
Retweet
user image
#DolphinCare AP Analysis Finds Bottlenose Dolphins Live Longer in Human Care Than in the Wild. http://t.co/edujNo5fSR
Retweet
user image
Killer Bottlenose Dolphins torture porpoise for fun http://t.co/qzAkeWtoyy #Tweet4Taiji #SeaShepherd
Retweet
user image
Guys I haven't seen bottlenose dolphins in a month I'm gonna freak out.
Retweet
user image
Large number of bottlenose dolphins spotted off the Rhyl coast by day fishing trip. http://t.co/pWULUlFVFO
Retweet
user image
Killer Bottlenose Dolphins torture porpoise for fun http://t.co/qzAkeWtoyy #Tweet4Taiji #SeaShepherd
Retweet
user image
but no in all seriousness I'd like to take this time to talk about the extinction of the western bottlenose dolphins
Retweet
Story
Digital Journal
·

Summary Scientists studying bottlenose dolphins that use sponges as tools to protect their sensitive beaks has shown that social behavior can shape the genetic makeup of an animal population in the wild. The study has been carried out on dolphins in Shark Bay in Western Australia. With many of these bottlenose dolphins, the mammals put conical marine sponges on their rostrums (beaks) when they forage on the sea floor.

Related Stories

Gallery